Laryngeal edema steroids

Edema is the swelling of tissues as a result of excess water accumulation. Peripheral edema occurs in the feet and legs. There are two types of edema, non-pitting edema and pitting edema. Causes of pitting edema is caused by systemic diseases (most commonly involving the heart, liver, and kidneys), and medications. Local conditions that cause edema are thrombophlebitis and varicose veins. Edema or swelling of the legs, feet, ankles, and face are common during pregnancy. Idiopathic edema is edema in which the cause is not known. Pitting edema is scored on pitting edema measurement scales. Edema is generally treated with medication.

The suggested dosage for androgens varies depending on the age, and diagnosis of the individual patient. Dosage is adjusted according to the patient’s response and the appearance of adverse reactions. The dosage guideline for the testosterone pellets for replacement therapy in androgen-deficient males is 150mg to 450mg subcutaneously every 3 to 6 months. Various dosage regimens have been used to induce pubertal changes in hypogonadal males; some experts have advocated lower doses initially, gradually increasing the dose as puberty progresses, with or without a decrease in maintenance levels. Other experts emphasize that higher dosages are needed to induce pubertal changes and lower dosages can be used for maintenance after puberty. The chronological and skeletal ages must be taken into consideration, both in determining the initial dose and in adjusting the dose.

The work required to initiate and sustain gas flow from most modern microprocessor-based ventilators is negligible and can be adjusted through selection of trigger modes, either pressure or flow, and selection of breath types. However, even more critical is the imposed WOB created by artificial airways. Care is required in the selection of a properly sized artificial airway and also in maintaining its patency with appropriate bronchial hygiene procedure. Inadvertent narrowing of an endotracheal or tracheotomy tube, from accumulated secretions or compression, will result in a profound increase in patient work.

I am a larenjectomy, whose operation took place October 2012. They took all my lympnodes, 70 % of my tongue, and I am unable to open my mouth large enough for them to put implants, I lost my teeth through radiation. This stiffness is almost unbearable at times.  I have steadily lost my ability to swallow, I do have a peg feed
And doubt that I will ever loose this, given my history of inability to swallow.
Is there anything that I can do to lessen the stiffness.  It takes a few hours in the morning to get to where I can swallow the thinness of liquid, by end of most days I can swallow a bit better, only to end up having to go to bed and get up the next am to start this process all over again. 
I have gone to a therapist, only to find they are extremely robust in there massages and end  off more stiff than before.  My Dr is going to try a stretch of my esophagus
He said they would be less aggressive because the last time they tried, my esophagus swoll up and closed off.
Any suggestions I could try at home at this stage 
Thanks 

Endogenous androgens, including testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), are responsible for the normal growth and development of the male sex organs and for maintenance of secondary sex characteristics. These effects include the growth and maturation of prostate , seminal vesicles, penis and scrotum; the development of male hair distribution, such as facial, pubic, chest and axillary hair; laryngeal enlargement, vocal chord thickening, alterations in body musculature and fat distribution. Testosterone and DHT are necessary for the normal development of secondary sex characteristics.

Tracheal stenosis is a relatively uncommon problem that has a variety of etiologies. It frequently has an insidious onset, and the early signs and symptoms may be disregarded or mistaken for a variety of other disorders. Shortness of breath on exertion, which may progress to dyspnea at rest, a brassy cough, recurrent pneumonitis, wheezing, stridor, and cyanosis may all be a part of the clinical presentation. because many of these symptoms, especially dyspnea on exertion and wheezing, can be easily attributed to other respiratory disorders such as chronic bronchitis and asthma, the patient's past medical history becomes particularly important.

Laryngeal edema steroids

laryngeal edema steroids

I am a larenjectomy, whose operation took place October 2012. They took all my lympnodes, 70 % of my tongue, and I am unable to open my mouth large enough for them to put implants, I lost my teeth through radiation. This stiffness is almost unbearable at times.  I have steadily lost my ability to swallow, I do have a peg feed
And doubt that I will ever loose this, given my history of inability to swallow.
Is there anything that I can do to lessen the stiffness.  It takes a few hours in the morning to get to where I can swallow the thinness of liquid, by end of most days I can swallow a bit better, only to end up having to go to bed and get up the next am to start this process all over again. 
I have gone to a therapist, only to find they are extremely robust in there massages and end  off more stiff than before.  My Dr is going to try a stretch of my esophagus
He said they would be less aggressive because the last time they tried, my esophagus swoll up and closed off.
Any suggestions I could try at home at this stage 
Thanks 

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